Column: Halloween — too little, too choco-late

Me+and+my+sister%2C+Maya+Wernick+%2718+posing+on+a+couch+wearing+Halloween+costumes+in+2009.+I+have+self-admittedly+dominated+the+Halloween+candy+trading+game+since+I+was+young.
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Column: Halloween — too little, too choco-late

Me and my sister, Maya Wernick '18 posing on a couch wearing Halloween costumes in 2009. I have self-admittedly dominated the Halloween candy trading game since I was young.

Me and my sister, Maya Wernick '18 posing on a couch wearing Halloween costumes in 2009. I have self-admittedly dominated the Halloween candy trading game since I was young.

Photo credit: Amy Wernick

Me and my sister, Maya Wernick '18 posing on a couch wearing Halloween costumes in 2009. I have self-admittedly dominated the Halloween candy trading game since I was young.

Photo credit: Amy Wernick

Photo credit: Amy Wernick

Me and my sister, Maya Wernick '18 posing on a couch wearing Halloween costumes in 2009. I have self-admittedly dominated the Halloween candy trading game since I was young.

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Picture six year-old me, walking back to her house with a pillowcase full of freshly acquired Halloween candy. For most kids, the night of Halloween is a time to stuff their faces with all the candy their parents will allow. For me, it is a night full of giving all the candy to my sister. No, it is not due to coercion or even a clever trick she plays. I willingly give my to candy to her precisely because of one factor: my picky eating habits.

Yes, it is true. I admit it: I am a picky eater. I always have been. I always will be. Whether it is ordering pasta with sauce on the side or ordering chicken noodle soup with “no chicken, no carrots, and no noodles,” I definitely consider myself to have a limited palate.

As hard as this is on the waitstaff that has to accommodate my unique eating habits, it is also pretty tough on me. For instance, when my friends ask me to split a meal, I start to panic and run through the steps. First, I have to explain to them all of my “restrictions,” and then shamefully tell them that it’s not allergies, it’s simply that I despise many foods. Most friends understand, but some just can’t comprehend how I can live without the carrots, chicken and noodles.

This is no different on the night of Halloween, and it has not been different ever since I could remember. For most kids with “normal” taste buds, Halloween is a night where Hershey’s Bars seem more like bars of gold. For me, however, it’s a night where I carry around a heavy pillowcase for my sister’s appetite rather than my own.  

Which is your favorite Halloween candy?

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This is not a fairytale ending where I have learned to eat more of a variety of foods— or candy. I basically still do not eat anything new, but I have started to learn how to find candies that I enjoy.

For other picky eaters out there, here are my tips:

1. Go for the bowls left on people’s porches. (Apparently, though, this does not happen in everyone’s neighborhoods — it does sound kind of sketchy when I think about it). This way, you can hand-pick the specific candy you like, rather than having someone shove the candy you do not like into your pillowcase.

2. If you find a house that has your favorites, take a whole bunch. I survive during Halloween by taking an abundance of my favorites that will last me in months to come. My personal favorites are the cherry Jolly Ranchers.

3. Later, at home, use “trading” to your advantage. With my specific strategy, I have continuously dominated the Halloween trading game since I was six. I collect all of the king size chocolate bars that everyone wants, then trade them for the few cherry Jolly Ranchers I can find. It’s a game only the best can play. 

If you follow my steps, you will dominate Halloween like never before.

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