Congressional candidate Kendra Horn speaks about female political empowerment

Kendra+Horn+speaks+to+the+student+body+during+lunch+about+women+in+politics.+She+is+running+to+be+the+representative+of+Oklahoma%27s+Fifth+Congressional+District.+
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Congressional candidate Kendra Horn speaks about female political empowerment

Kendra Horn speaks to the student body during lunch about women in politics. She is running to be the representative of Oklahoma's Fifth Congressional District.

Kendra Horn speaks to the student body during lunch about women in politics. She is running to be the representative of Oklahoma's Fifth Congressional District.

Kendra Horn speaks to the student body during lunch about women in politics. She is running to be the representative of Oklahoma's Fifth Congressional District.

Kendra Horn speaks to the student body during lunch about women in politics. She is running to be the representative of Oklahoma's Fifth Congressional District.

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Students gathered in the Rose Room on Oct. 9 to hear Kendra Horn, the Democratic nominee for the 5th Congressional District in Oklahoma, speak about the role of women in politics and her political journey.

Horn is running to be the third woman to be from Oklahoma on the United States Congress. According to her website, Horn’s parents taught her from the young age about the “importance of investing in people and serving her community.”

She started getting involved in the democratic system when she was a 11 or 12 by knocking on doors and volunteering for campaigns.

“I am really focused on this seat and making a difference,” Horn said. “I didn’t move back to Oklahoma with the thought of running for Congress. I moved back because I saw problems that needed to be tackled and challenges that could be solved that could both help our economic situation [and] help people.”

Horn said she aims to fix issues such as education, health care and women’s rights.

“I think that I need to focus on making the difference there. And for me, running is about public service,” she said. “It’s about what I can show up and do for my community. “

An email sent out by Upper School history teacher Margaret Shirk encouraged students with diverse political beliefs to attend. 

Freshman Lexi Tooley said hearing Horn was “empowering.”

“She was talking about how she had to face all of these obstacles,” Tooley said. “We really learned a lot about what…women that are trying to get into politics have to face everyday.”

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