Artists Kisa Rozenbaoum, Elizabeth Endo showcase ‘sick’ art in senior show

Seniors Kisa Rozenbaoum and Elizabeth Endo sit inside of their art show in the Eastern Star Gallery. Image courtesy of Kisa Rozenbaoum.

Seniors Kisa Rozenbaoum and Elizabeth Endo sit inside of their art show in the Eastern Star Gallery. Image courtesy of Kisa Rozenbaoum.

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Students and faculty entered the Eastern Star Gallery, eating cereal out of blue plastic cups while taking in the artwork that lined the walls. “Sick,” a joint art show by Kisa Rozenbaoum ‘18 and Elizabeth Endo ‘18, opened on Wednesday, May 9 at 12 P.M.

According to Endo and Rozenbaoum, “sick” is a word that has both a positive and negative connotation.  The two seniors wanted to embrace both sides of the word through their art. 

The left side of the Eastern Star Gallery featured Rozenbaoum’s art. Rosenbaum said she lives for humor and channels this through her characters.

Many of her pieces include a lot of color, detail and personality. Rozenbaoum also included an animation she made as a part of her show, which played off of a projector in the room.

Endo’s art was displayed on the right side of the room. She said she incorporated skulls into her work to symbolize the fact that “no matter who you are or what you’ve been through, we are all just skeletons.”

A few of Kisa Rozenbaoum’s pieces featured in her senior art show. The show opened on Wednesday, May 9.

Both artists’ shows were mostly comprised of art that they’ve made over the course of the past year, with some additional pieces from previous years. They decided to do an art show together because they each felt that their work “complemented” the other’s.

“It was kind of overwhelming at some parts because there were so many people,” Rozenbaoum said. “They were all looking at my art and it was kind of intimidating, but then I was like, ‘They’re here to support.'”

Endo and Rozenbaoum felt it was important to have a more “interactive” art show. They hoped including animation and a ball pit made it more interesting for all students.

“I was happy to see so many people in the community getting excited about art,” Endo said.

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